A Bird in the Hand is Worth Ten in a Dish

If I had to count how many single portion meals I can get from one fresh chicken, I would have to say at least ten – yes, you read that correctly: ten!  That’s ten individual meals from one regular sized chicken.  I’m not Merlin the Magician, I’m just a mere mortal woman who insists on getting value for money & doesn’t like waste.

We’ve all done it – shopping tired, hungry, after work or at the last minute, so you buy pre-prepared chicken portions to cook for dinner. Not only is it ridiculously more expensive (think of the wine you could buy!), but learning to do it yourself is a great skill to have & it’s very satisfying knowing that you’ve got meals in the freezer for when you can’t be bothered to cook.

This is how I bone & fillet a chicken – I’m self-taught, it’s just me in the kitchen at home & this is the way I do it.  If you’re squeamish, please skip the next couple of paragraphs (I understand).

Before I begin, I usually give my husband a beer & hustle him off into the lounge (because he doesn’t like to watch, bless him).  Then I get to work!

Firstly, I pop the legs out of their sockets, then slide my boning knife between the socket & joint, removing the legs from the body – I use scissors to cut the skin between them & the body, because it’s easier.  Once that’s done, I carefully peel the skin back from the chicken crown (leaving it attached to the carcass) & feel where the breastbone is – this runs across the top of the chicken.  Carefully, I slide the knife as closely to the bone as I can, using firm strokes to cut the meat away from the breastbone & rib cage.    Once done on both sides, the bones should be pretty much clean & all that’s left is a thin membrane with the ribs intact.  A few minutes later, I have a plate of prepped chicken portions & a carcass to make a fuss-free stock.

Making stock is really easy – I make mine in the oven, not on the stove (because who has the time).  I stuff the carcass with a handful of fresh herbs (usually a couple of sprigs of Rosemary, half a dozen Sage leaves & a bunch of Thyme), along with some leafy stems of celery & a couple of carrot sticks, pulling the skin back over the top of the chicken to hold it all in.  Then it’s chucked in a roasting tray with some chopped, chunky veg & two or three of pints of cold water, a drizzle of olive oil & a good sprinkling of sea salt & black pepper.  I’ll whack it in the oven for a couple of hours with foil on top & once ready, it will cool on a wire rack before everything is tipped into a colander over a large pan to drain.  That’s the stock done!  It can keep in the fridge for a couple of days or you can freeze it.

That fragrant, golden stock will make a generous risotto for four people (or a risotto for two & risotto balls for more than two people the day after).  The legs make a great pollo alla cacciatore for two or can simply be roasted in the oven with some lemon & Thyme.  Then there are the very versatile chicken breasts – these are almost double the size of the ones you get in those pre-prepared packs!  Usually, I can make four kievs per chicken (coating them in homemade breadcrumbs of course), or use each breast to make a meal for two people – pie, curry, sweet & sour, whatever I like!  Plus, if someone is feeling a bit under the weather, I make a couple of bowlfuls of homemade soup using the vegetables that roasted with the carcass & a little diluted stock (which is why I always wash the veg before roasting).  It’s a great “pick me up”, especially when you have a few slices of warm, buttered bread to dunk in it too.

Let’s not forget the meat on the underside of the carcass & the wings – I strip this tender, lean chicken for our beautiful cat, who does a great Dyson impression & vacuums it from her plate!

If I can make more than ten meals from one chicken, anyone can – all it takes is a bit of practise & imagination, all for the princely sum of one lovely, whole chicken.   Where else can you get ten decent sized servings for about a fiver?

So show the chicken some respect: use the whole bird, fill your family & save yourself some money too.  A x

 

Simple Roasted Potatoes

Actually, “simple” doesn’t really do these potatoes justice.  Believe me, I spent hours trying to make the perfect roasted potatoes.  I’ve par-boiled them, used all kinds of different oils, fats, different varieties of potato, followed all the recipes I could & still ended up with what can only be described as cremated (but somehow still raw) missiles that you could injure yourself with!   So one day, I decided I was going to do it my way & it worked – crispy on the outside, fluffy in the middle & really easy to do.

For roasting potatoes, you need to invest in a heavy-duty baking tin for the oven & the more you use it, the better it gets.  Before using them, I like to season my tins – which is basically heating them up with a little oil in, wiping it off with kitchen paper & repeating a couple of times. Please don’t put them in the dishwasher – rinse them with hot water, dry well with kitchen paper & put them away.

What you need:

Some washed & dried baby potatoes, skin on (I use about half a kilo to feed 3-4 people, so just add more if you have more guests)
Extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Black pepper
Some chopped fresh Rosemary – optional (just strip the leaves from a sprig & chop finely)

How to do it:

Heat the oven to 220*C.  On a chopping board, cut the potatoes in half lengthways.  If you want to give them a bit more texture, cut little slices in the curved top all the way along (hasselback style).

Spread some olive oil on a baking tin, put the potato halves in curved side down & then drizzle more olive oil on the top, give them a good sprinkle of the sea salt & pepper.  If you want to add some rosemary, sprinkle some of that too.  Get your hands in, toss the potatoes in the oil & seasonings, making sure they are well coated & that they are all returned to their curved side down position.

Put them in the top part of the oven, for about 15 minutes until they are sizzling & golden.  If they have stuck a bit, just use a spatula or tongs (nothing metal though or you’ll damage your tray) & ease them away from the tin.  At this point, turn them over carefully & return to the oven for about 10 minutes or so until crispy.

Remove them from the tin & serve – if you want to, you can always pop them on some kitchen paper to remove any excess oil, but I find a good shake does a pretty good job & it’s not lard, so you’ll be fine.

They tend to evaporate pretty quickly in my house (which is why there’s no picture at the moment), so I suggest keeping a few back for you!  These go with everything from roast dinners to salmon fillets.

Enjoy!  A x